Current Performances
Body Not Fit For Purpose

Jonathan Burrows and Matteo Fargion
30 minutes
Body Not Fit For Purpose was commissioned by the 2014 Venice Biennale
There's a beguiling mix of the scholarly, the quizzical and the righteously indignant that is unique to Fargion and Burrows...the concentration of their work demonstrates how much expressive power even a small gesture, a tiny variation of tone or rhythm, can possess.
Danceblog with Judith Mackrell, The Guardian London, 23rd June 2014



Cheap Lecture and The Cow Piece (2009)
Jonathan Burrows and Matteo Fargion
60 minutes no interval
Cheap Lecture was selected for Het Theaterfestival Belgium 2009.
'There are few performers who can hold an audience captive like this double act… the timing of every note, shrug, laugh and gesture is awesome. Five stars.'
The Guardian, London
'Jonathan Burrows and Matteo Fargion have created a performance that dances in your head. It's superb.'
De Morgen, Belgium


Counting To One Hundred and One Flute Note (2011)
Jonathan Burrows and Matteo Fargion
60 minutes no interval
'A gestural panorama of blatant joy'
Süddeutsche Zeitung, Munich


Show And Tell (2007/13)
Jonathan Burrows and Matteo Fargion
60 minutes no interval
Jonathan Burrows and Matteo Fargion explore the hidden influences that have led to a growing body of work made together over many years, and in particular their long series of recent duets. Revealing the vital role that mimicry plays in creative process, Burrows and Fargion compose a presentation of formative images and sounds, and in so doing examine what is absorbed and transformed, buried and disclosed, engaged and appropriated in the making of performance works.























Both Sitting Duet (2002)
Jonathan Burrows and Matteo Fargion
Winner of a 2004 New York 'Bessie' Award.
40 minutes
'It was certainly one of the funniest and most ingenious dances seen in New York in a long time.'
The New York Times


The Quiet Dance (2005)
and Speaking Dance (2006)
Jonathan Burrows and Matteo Fargion
35 minutes and 45 minutes with a 20 minute interval
'Absurdist self-indulgence you'll be thinking, but what you see is revelation and joy.'
The Evening Standard, London